lift

Q: 3 Months Post BA and Anchor Lift: Will a Lollipop Lift Help Saggy Breasts?

Submitted by Q-A from clee on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 13:07

I had a BA and anchor lift on 1/12/11. My rt breast developed a capsular contracture and my left breast is falling into my arm pit and is flat in the upper pole and the bottom is flat and pointy and ugly. My right breast has the CC but at least it has upper fullness. Both are still saggy. My PS agreed to do a lollipop lift for free in his office under a local. If I want the CC removed I have to pay $2400 for hosp/anesthesia fees only. Do you think a lift will help and is it ok to ignore CC?

A: Based on your photos I suspect the implants are submuscular...

Submuscular implants with mastopexy are challenges for recurrent double bubble and waterfall deformity as the breast descent is common while the submuscluar implant is trapped high by the muscle.

Perhaps you should consider having this addressed by implant exchange into submammary position with cohesive gel and a redo mastopexy.

I am not in favor of simply a mastopexy in the office.

Q: Bad Results After Several Breast Augmentations and Two Lifts: What Can I Do?

Submitted by Q-A from clee on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 11:13

I have had several breast surgeries. Some good some bad. With childbirth in between, came the necessity to re-do the original breast aug with a lift. I met with a wonderful doctor. It was recommended to me this time, to get gummy bear implants...Right now, I have implants placed above the muscle, and they are silicone gel..the problem is I am afraid to have more necrosis or an even worse result.

I had some slight nipple necrosis from the first surgery. Should I do this over less than 1 yr later?

A: Detailed history and exam are necessary

Good preparation and precise execution of a plan is a formula that reliably leads to success outcomes. This starts with a detailed history and examination. While online posting of more details and photos may assist a plastic surgeon, it is better to rely on the following: 1) the logic of the treatment plan 2) reputation of the surgeon  3) your personal experience during the consultation as to how your list of priorities and questions were addressed by the plastic surgeon. If in doubt obtain another opinion. Only with a physical meeting can a surgeon express confidence in his/her  plan to resolving your concerns.

Q: Tubular Breasts, Lift and Augmentation Options

Submitted by Q-A from clee on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 08:10

Dear experts, I would like to know what type of operation methods you would pick for this type of breast. I assume these are tubular as there is a wide gap between, the areola is that huge and as there is only little space between the areola and the crease of the breast.

Is it possible to breastfeed with such breasts in the first place and if yes will it be possible after an operation? Also, can implants be placed so that it doesnt show, even with so little own tissue? Thank you very much!

A: Breast feeding is possible now but might be affected after surgery

Using your photos a good surgical plan might include the following:

  1. Lowering your inframammary fold
  2. Areolar reduction with periareolar incisional access for implant placement
  3. Releasing the breast tissue so that it spreads and redistrubutes evenly around the implant
  4. Submammary placement of the implant

Right now your ability to breast feed should not be affected however after surgery listed above you might not be able to as the release of breast tissues may disrupt the breast ducts.