Q: Tubular Breasts, Lift and Augmentation Options

Submitted by Q-A from clee on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 08:10

Dear experts, I would like to know what type of operation methods you would pick for this type of breast. I assume these are tubular as there is a wide gap between, the areola is that huge and as there is only little space between the areola and the crease of the breast.

Is it possible to breastfeed with such breasts in the first place and if yes will it be possible after an operation? Also, can implants be placed so that it doesnt show, even with so little own tissue? Thank you very much!

A: Breast feeding is possible now but might be affected after surgery

Using your photos a good surgical plan might include the following:

  1. Lowering your inframammary fold
  2. Areolar reduction with periareolar incisional access for implant placement
  3. Releasing the breast tissue so that it spreads and redistrubutes evenly around the implant
  4. Submammary placement of the implant

Right now your ability to breast feed should not be affected however after surgery listed above you might not be able to as the release of breast tissues may disrupt the breast ducts.

Q: Loss of Sensibility After a Breast Augmentation Surgery Through Periolar Incision

Submitted by Q-A from clee on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 07:25

I am a 26 years old female and I just had a breast augmentation and areola reduction through periareolar incision 3 weeks ago. Before the surgery, the sensibility of my nipples was normal and sometimes, when it was cold, not only the nipple but the whole areola contracted. Now, 3 weeks after the surgery, my nipples are numb and the areola does not contract anymore I want to know if the sensibility of the nipples will return as well as the areola contraction?

A:What you are experiencing is common

What you are experiencing is common and expected this early after breast augmentation. Most patients will have improvement commencing at 6 weeks and becoming progressively better in the ensuing year.

Q: Are my Breasts Considered Abnormal and Tubular?

Submitted by Q-A from clee on Fri, 05/13/2011 - 06:11

My breasts are very small and set far apart, with large areola's that almost point to my sides. I have had 2 miscarriages and since then, I have noticed a greater loss in breast mass / tissue at the upper portion of my breasts. They have always looked disfigured to me and I am very self conscious because of this. So, is this a normal condition? Or tubular? What can be done to repair the abnormality? Thank you.

A: Tubular breasts are characterized by having a constricted breast base.

Tubular breasts are characterized by having a constricted breast base with resulting breast ptosis and widened areola from upward displacement of the the breast tissue under the nipple.  All the tissues are normal.  However most plastic surgeons pay much attention to this breast form as the best corrective treatments require thought and adjustments in our breast augmentation techniques to have the best outcomes.

Specific to your case, breast tissues are normal but the form is indeed tubular but not severe.  In planning your treatment there would need be a plan to address the following: 1) constricted base to your breast, 2) psuedoptosis of the breast, 3) volume enhancement, 4) areola reduction, 5) lateral positioning of your nipple areola complex.

Points 1-4 can be simply addressed in your case with lowering of your inframammary crease and release of breast tissue to expand the breast base, submammary placement of a implant to correct volume, and areolar reduction.  However point #5 remains a problem as its treatment is less predictable.  A thorough discussion of the risk benefits of a surgical plan for your lateralized NAC should be had with your plastic surgeon as the resulting scars for treatment of laterlized NAC may not be the best return for your energies.  Best of luck to you.